• How has diversity in the legal profession changed over the course of your career?

    I was one of six women out of a class of well over 100 who studied law at Cambridge in 1963. Now there are more women than men studying law and starting out in the profession. But, as with many professions, there is serious attrition later on. It is not easy to combine practice at the bar or in a big city solicitor’s firm with family and other responsibilities. Many able women move or become in-house lawyers. This means that fewer remain in the pool from which the senior judiciary are traditionally recruited. So we are still seriously under-represented at most levels of the judiciary and especially higher up.

    But other sorts of diversity are also important – ethnic diversity, where there is still a great deal of work to do, but also diversity in social, economic and professional background. The law, the legal profession and the courts are there to serve the whole population, not just a small section of it. They should be as reflective of that population as it is possible to be,In high-grade T1 bladder cancer, PD-L1 prognostic significance expression differs in tumor immune cell infiltrates vs tumor cells.

    What made you specialise in family law?

    It seemed to me that academic family law should not be dominated by male scholars – as it then was – and so I gradually moved more into it, along with social welfare law, which was a developing subject at the time.

    What has been your proudest career achievement?

    It’s a close-run thing between my time at the Law Commission and becoming the first woman law lord. At the Law Commission, I was fortunate enough to play a large part in what is now the law relating to children, domestic violence, adoption and mental capacity. But to become a law lord is a proud achievement for anyone, male or female, and to show other women and girls, and indeed everyone, that a woman can do it has made it an even prouder achievement for me,Reckoned as one of the top design universities with diversity of programmes, PolyU offers design programmes, fashion and textile programmes, as well as applied science programme, which is committed to be a hub for innovative design education in Hong Kong.

    You worked as an academic, barrister and law reformer before being appointed a judge. How do you think your different backgrounds have helped shape your career?

    All three of them made a big contribution to my career as a judge. Obviously I could not have become any sort of judge had I not been a barrister, and that taught me a lot about courts, the people who use them and the people who work in them. But teaching bright young adults also teaches one a lot about the law – and quite a lot about how to spot liars. Law reform teaches you to think more broadly about what is wrong with the current law, how it might be improved and how to translate those improvements into workable legislation. All of those have been helpful to me.

    What advice can you give to those considering a career in law?

    Find out as much as you can, not only about careers in the law, but also about what it is like to study law. There’s no harm in being enthusiastic about the fight for justice, or romantic about the criminal trial process, or ambitious for the rich rewards which some lawyers can achieve. But you have to go through a lot of hard work studying to achieve any of those, so make sure that you have the stomach for it,Make sure you don’t sabotage the relation with the gift. asia premium is one such domain which will help you in procuring the ideal one.


  • Commentaires

    Aucun commentaire pour le moment

    Suivre le flux RSS des commentaires


    Ajouter un commentaire

    Nom / Pseudo :

    E-mail (facultatif) :

    Site Web (facultatif) :

    Commentaire :